Grass Fed Irish Butter Burgers (Friday feeling)

What could possibly make a flavor packed grass fed burger better?  Try adding some grass fed Irish butter? Kneading in some grated frozen grass fed Irish butter to your burger makes the juiciest flavor packed mouthful ever!

Get this...Cooking Light Magazine said that lean grass fed beef has a nutrition profile more similar to salmon than grain fed beef! – wow! Cooking light also mentions grass fed beef has half the saturated fat of dark meat chicken!  So, with all that said we could afford to add just a little grass fed butter?  I mean what could be wrong adding more good fat?   Please allow me to share the secret of one of the best burgers you will ever make (or taste)? A ‘wee bit ‘ of Irish goodness goes a very long way…

Grass Fed Butter Burger

(recipe makes 4 ¼ Lb patties)

  • (for the Pattie)
  • 1 lb lean grass fed ground sirloin
  • 3 Tbsp (grated frozen or very cold unsalted Kerrygold Irish butter)
  • ¼ tsp kosher salt
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 onion
  • 1 Tbsp canola oil
  • (for the burger)
  • 4 slices of Kerrygold Dubliner cheese
  • 3 Tbsp tomato ketchup
  • 4 Brioche buns (toasted)
  • 4 slices of thickly sliced tomato (optional)
  • 4 slices of Bibb lettuce (optional)

 

How to make them

  1. Preheat the grill to medium high.
  2. Caramelize the onion in a little canola or grape seed oil for a few minutes to soften.  Set aside and cool.
  3. Break up  the sirloin and sprinkle with the salt and pepper, garlic powder and stir in the caramelized cooled onions..
  4. Use a box grater to grate the butter grate directly over the ground sirloin keeping everything very cold (try not to touch with hands to prevent the butter from melting).
  5. Gently knead the butter in to the burger and then divide in to 4 patties.
  6. Cook the patties for 3 minutes on one side and then turn top with cheese and then tun them over and grill for another 2-4 minutes.
  7. To serve toast the bun and top the patties with tomato ketchup, bib lettuce and freshly sliced tomato. Place filling inside of bun and enjoy!

Happy Grilling!  Summer is almost here!

Judie the Irish foodie

 

A taste of tea and history

You can tell by now that I am pretty crazy about history! So combing tea and history has me working in my element.  I was asked to host an Irish afternoon tea event at Barrington Hall, an 1839 Greek Revival style mansion in downtown Roswell, Georgia earlier this month.  The building is ranked as one of the 50 most beautiful homes in Metro Atlanta and it’s been fully restored and furnished with many period and family pieces. The original owner, Roswell King’s daughter (Eva and her husband Rev. William Baker) moved into Barrington Hall in 1883 and owned a tea and coffee importing company. The Bakers have entertained some rather famous people for tea including President Theodore Roosevelt and Margaret Mitchell, so, naturally I wanted to know about the tea they imported and served and ferociously began researching.

The tea that they imported was Orange Peoke!  The ‘orange’ in Peoke is sometimes mistaken to mean the tea has been flavored with actual orange.  However, the word “orange” is unrelated and refers to the Dutch house of orange black tea leaves of a specific size and quality.  These grading are typically used from teas from Sri Lanka, India other than China.  After research I found that the closest tea I could serve was an Irish Breakfast tea (I served Punjana).  Irish Breakfast has a higher proportion of Assam blended with a little Ceylon.  The Assam is copper colored and what we call in Ireland ‘a hearty brew’ and it’s good with a wee spot of milk.  We like to say it’s full of Malty gusto and it’s great any time of the day (if your Irish or Irish at heart).

So, I hope this inspires you to fill a kettle and enjoy a spot of Irish tea that’s been enjoyed from Victorian times and a historic pleasure we can all afford to enjoy every day!

Hope you make time for a cuppa today!

Judith the Irish foodie

Thanks to NPR for a wonderful Tribute

Many thanks for the interview with NPR that took place just time for me to announce my 2nd edition printing of the Shamrock and Peach, which is now available!

It felt so natural to share my passion with Atlanta writer Beth Ware who identified immediately with the Southern connections to Irish cuisine, and it was a joy to share my passions for food and Irish culture with her.  – Hopefully you have had a chance to check out the article, but if not see the link below:

http://news.wabe.org/post/irish-chef-plants-her-culinary-roots-deep-south

So, the new edition is literally hot off the presses, and I would be glad to sign and send out copies through my website, in addition to the book being available through the usual outlets.  I am also pleased to share all the recipes that were featured on my recent Kerrygold tour with Aprons Publix cooking schools, which were also posted on the NPR website …enjoy!

So, a belated happy St. Patrick’s day to all my followers and as I always say..

Joy in the Journey Y’all

Judith the Irish foodie

 

 

 

Ginger Pear & Parsnip Soup

pear-and-parsnip-soup-12The cooler Winter months are the perfect time for cooking root vegetables, especially when it comes to bowls of comforting soups, broths and stews. – such an Irish thing, and living in a warm climate such as Georgia, I always enjoy the opportunity for wonderful soups.

This week I had the opportunity to cook at the Piedmont Cancer Center in Atlanta with a menu featuring Winter Root Vegetables, which gave me the perfect opportunity to pull out some recipes from the homeland. – Growing up as a child in Ireland, my favorite vegetables were always mashed carrots with parsnips, and along with roasted parsnips, -essential parts of a traditional Irish Sunday roast dinner. So, when creating nutritious recipes for my Root Vegetable class I was naturally drawn to include parsnips in the menu.

When preparing this delicious soup, the inclusion of fresh ginger and curry, alongside the root vegetables, gives this soup a modern Asian flair while the fresh pears add a natural sweetness. Julienne matchstick pears on top, then gives the dish a refreshing fresh and surprising crunch.  

I do hope you enjoy this healthy recipe which is so good for the body and great the soul!  Finish the soup with a little cream, or olive oil -your choice! It’s all good…

Parsnip and Ginger Pear Soup (with fresh pear garnish and olive oil)
 

  • 2 Tbsp coconut oil or Kerrygold butter
  • 1 medium (1 cup) Vidalia onions (chopped)
  • 1 celery stick (3/4 cup diced)
  • 4 parsnips (4 cups peeled and diced)
  • 2 medium (1 ½ cups) pears (peeled and chopped)
  • 2 tsp grated fresh ginger
  • 6 cups vegetable stock
  • 2 cups pear juice
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tsp curry powder
  • (to garnish)
  • ½ pear (cut in to matchsticks)
  • Squeeze of lemon juice
  • Drizzle of good olive oil (or creame fraiche)

How to make it
 

  1. In a large soup pot, melt the butter or coconut oil and sauté the onions, celery, parsnips, pears and grated fresh ginger over a medium to low heat, then over and cook until they are fragrant and beginning to color for another 8-10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  2. Add the stock, pear juice, curry powder and salt and pepper and simmer for 25 minutes until all the ingredients are tender and the liquid has slightly reduced. Taste to adjust seasoning.
  3. Using a hand blender puree the soup until smooth or use a food processor.
  4. To serve place 1 tsp of chopped pear in each warm bowl followed by the soup and then drizzle with a little olive oil.

Judith the Irish foodie

Welcome first day of Spring! (St. Bridget Feast Day in Ireland)

The first day of Spring (Feb 1st) has been important in Ireland from the Neolithic period.  In Ireland the lighting of fires and candles invited the power of the sun in the period between the cold Winter months and Spring!  Can you believe it folks….? We’re almost there and I am ready for the warmth of the sun and the buds of Spring to appear.

The relics of St. Bridget and Columcille are said to be enclosed in Downpatrick in the same grave as our National St. Patrick.  I loved this photography shared on the Friends of Saint Patrick’s website today of a group of students from John Brown University in Missouri placing a St. Bridget’s cross on the grave.  The hanging of the St. Bridget cross on the front door is symbolically asking Gods protection on livestock and homes in many homes in rural Ireland.

Those of  you who have been on Shamrock and Peach tours are familiar with Dr. Tim Campbell and this quote he often shares around the grave side.

“In Downpatrick, three saints one grave do fill, Patrick, Bridget and Columcille”

Welcome Spring and and let the feasting of St. Bridget begin!

Judith the Irish foodie

 

Christmas Scones are Gingerbread Heaven

Ginger Scone Recipe

Gingerbread Scones for Christmas Brunch

Certain smells and flavors conjure up the essence of Christmas!  Just like the aromas of the spices baking in the oven of my favorite Gingerbread Scones.  Gingerbread is an Old World recipe that has somehow become synonymous with the Christmas Season around the world including both Ireland and America.  These Gingerbread Scones are perfect for holiday brunch are always a hit especially when served with Lemon Curd and Fresh Whipped Cream.  Enjoy the season and the spices of Christmas..  It’s the time!

Gingerbread Scones with Clotted Lemon Cream

Gingerbread scone ingredients (makes ½ dozen):

  • 1 lb. (4 cups) self-rising flour
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 2 oz. (¼ cup) dark brown sugar
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. ground powdered ginger
  • ½ tsp. nutmeg
  • ¾ tsp. cinnamon
  • 6 oz. (¾ cup) butter (cold and cut into small pieces)
  • 1 egg (beaten)
  • 4 fl. oz. (½ cup) buttermilk
  • 2 fl. oz. (¼ cup) molasses
  • egg wash (1 egg beaten with a little water or milk)

 

How to make them:

  1. Preheat your oven to 425° F.
  2. Sift the flour with the baking powder then combine the remaining dry ingredients together in a food processor or a large mixing bowl.
  3. Cut the cold butter into the mixed dry ingredients then rub the mixture together with your fingertips or add them slowly to a food processor to form a breadcrumb-like texture.
  4. Beat the buttermilk, egg, and molasses together in a small bowl and combine with the dry ingredients, mixing well.
  5. Turn the resulting dough out onto a lightly floured surface.
  6. Knead the dough a few times and then roll it out with a lightly floured rolling pin until it’s about ¾” thick.
  7. Cut the scones out of the flattened dough using a 1” biscuit cutter.
  8. Brush dough scones with egg wash and place onto a lightly greased baking sheet.
  9. Bake 12–15 minutes until well risen and golden brown on top, turning the baking tray halfway through baking time to ensure even baking.
  10. Best served warm. Serve sliced in half and slathered with clotted cream.

Happy Holiday Baking!

Judith the Irish Foodie

 

Lemon Posset is making a come back!

Lemon and Raspberry Posset

The Posset makes a come back

This tangy lemon dessert is perfect for holiday entertaining and fantastic paired with ginger snaps or Irish butter shortbread.  During my Shamrock and Peach Tours last year I was pleasantly surprised to see ‘the Posset’ making a come back in many of our top Irish Chef’s menus.

…and what is a posset I hear you cry? The Posset goes as far back to medieval times where hot milk was flavored with honey, wine or ale. Today, the Posset has evolved to a dessert classic and is simply delicious with passion fruit and citrus. The lemon is perfect for holiday entertaining and I like to serve them in tiny shot glasses for the perfect small indulgent treat….just perfect!

Here is the recipe and what’s not to like about a recipe with 3 simple ingredients?

Lemon Posset:

  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 2 lemons (5 Tbsp plus zest)
  • 2/3 cups sugar
  • ¼ cup berries (for garnish)

How to make it:

Finely grate the zest of lemons and then juice.

  1. In a small saucepan heat the cream, sugar and lemon zest to a gentle boil stirring for about 5 minutes until the sugar has dissolved.
  2. Remove the saucepan from the heat and stir in the lemon juice.
  3. Allow the posset to cool slightly before pouring in to containers (4 Martini glasses or 8 shot glasses).
  4. Refrigerate for several hours before serving.
  5. Before serving garnish with fresh berries.

Merry Christmas and I hope this graces some holiday parties this season!

Joy in the Journey

Judith the Irish foodie

Shamrock and Peach Cobbler

Summer Peach Cobbler

Shamrock and Peach Cobbler

In celebration of my return to Georgia after spending 5 weeks in Ireland leading 3 very fun filled tours, it’s time to make dessert!  Summer has arrived here in Georgia with the harvest of fragrant juicy peaches, so, its time to make one of the South’s most beloved desserts, namely Peach Cobbler.  When fruits are in season, no frills desserts that accentuate the flavor and texture are the way to go!  Our ‘go to’ fruit dessert growing up in Ireland is always a crumble topping made with oats, and in this case, a transition to a cobbler from a crumble makes perfect sense and achieves the same delicious goal of warm luscious fruit textures with a perfect crumbly paring, and oh, don’t forget the ice cream.

I hope you enjoy this recipe and savor each summer day before it’s gone!

Peach Cobbler

(serves 6)

  • (for the peach filling)
  • 8-10 medium size peaches
  • 1 vanilla pod (scraped)
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 tsp cornstarch
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp honey
  • 2 Tbsp unsalted Kerrygold Irish butter
  • (for the topping)
  • 1 ½ cups of all purpose flour
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 1 ½ tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 4 ½ oz unsalted Kerrygold Irish butter (cold)
  • ¼ cup boiling water
  • 2 Tbsp milk

How to make it

  1. To make the peach filling toss the peaches with the sugar, cornstarch and vanilla seeds. Melt 1 Tbsp of unsalted butter in the pan and add the peach mixture and cook for 6-7 minutes until the peaches begin to break down but are still firm.  Add the lemon juice and honey and chill.
  2. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
  3. To make the cobbler sift the flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Using your finger tips or food processor blend in the chilled butter until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.  Stir in the boiling water and milk.
  4. To assemble the cobblers grease 6 small dishes or one 8’ pan with butter. Spoon in the peach filling and then add the topping by dropping spoonfuls of the batter on top of the peaches.
  5. Bake for 25 minutes until the topping is golden brown and serve with ice-cream.

Joy in the Journey, and enjoy the summer!

Judith the Irish foodie

 

An Irish Spring Blessing Tea at Salud!

In the past, an Irish blessing was spoken without being considered religious, but as a way of life – no one thought to question them. Here, in the American South, southern belles proclaim  “Bless her heart” just as in Ireland we would often say “God Bless you” or “God rest your soul” and as such, many of these spoken habits from the past have survived, though their use is diminishing. The Irish wit of telling jokes, making toasts and speaking blessings holds true to the richness of family and friends, so, I thought to harken back to a more gilded age this past weekend and I hosted an Irish afternoon tea party at the Wholefoods Salud! Cooking School  where we not only enjoyed delightful treats but used and highlighted spoken Irish Blessings with each tea pairing!  It was a joy, and put a spring in our step this Spring! Yes, it was a blessing!

Here is our menu…

Peach Sparkle (Sparkling Wine with a hint of Peach)

Menu

Savories: Irish smoked Salmon Moose on Potato Boxty with Dill, Open Ham and Guinness Red Onion Soda Bread Sandwiches, Irish Spring Onion Soup shots, Second Breakfast Sage and Onion Sausage Bites

Served with Irish Black Tea

Scones and Breads: Irish Blueberry and White Chocolate Scones with Lemon Curd and Clotted Cream and buttered Earl Grey Tea Bread

Served with Earl Grey Tea

Sweets: Shamrock and Peach Macaroons, Irish Butter Fudge with a Chocolate Swirl

Served with Honey Vanilla Nectar Honeybush Rooibos

…and let me  conclude this post with an Irish Blessing or two, just for you…

“May you life as long as you want and never want as long as you live”
“May springtime never be far from you”

Joy in the Journey!

Judith the Irish foodie

 

 

Irish Styled Trout with Oat Crumble, Beetroot and Spinach

 News flash! Oat Crumble’s not just for fruit desserts…let me encourage you to try this delicious savory crumble on pan seared fish for an added textural crunch of Irish goodness…

Oats are in our Irish DNA because we have been eating them for centuries (before potatoes) as our essential daily diet – oatcakes, oatmeal, you name it! So, Irish people know oats, which are very much the rage again due to the health benefits, and they taste great! –  I then infused some reduced fig balsamic from Oli and Ve in to the beetroot for a delicious puree, added a little spinach and raw radish to finish the dish, and hey-ho, there you go…

Here’s the easy crumble recipe!

  • (Savory Oat Crumble)
  • ½ cup Walnuts (chopped)
  • ½ cup oats
  • 4 Tbsp salted Kerrygold butter
  • 1tsp lemon zest
  • 2 Tbsp dill
  • 1 Tbsp parsley

How to make it:

  1. In a food processor combine the walnuts and oats and pulse to combine.
  2. Melt the butter in a medium skillet and stir in the oats and walnuts and toast until they are a golden color.  Remove from the heat and stir in the lemon zest, dill and parsley.

…oh, and as spring advances let me remind you that we only have a few spaces left on our Irish tours this summer, so if you would like to see the emerald isle and experience the incredible food and culture there for yourself, please check out my tour dates before the opportunity slips away:

www.shamrockandpeach.com

Enjoy the journey!
Judith the Irish foodie