Neeps and Tatties Patties (Burns Day Grub)

Veggie Burger with a Scottish twist

Burns Day Dinner

In honor of Burns Night, and the celebration of the famed Scottish poet, Robert Burns, may I present to you ‘Neeps and Tatties Patties’…

An authentic Burns Night Supper includes whisky, haggis, Neeps and Tatties (Potatoes and Turnips). However, my family are taking a different approach tonight and going with a ‘Veggie Burger’ with mashed turnip, sweet potato and oats; a really tasty and nutritious alternative to haggis!  I think even Rabbie himself would agree it’s a great substitution… so Cheers to you Rabbie (and we will be raising our glass tonight in your honor)

…and, let me say, there’s no substitution for Scotch ‘whisky’ so please, rest easy in your grave tonight… we get it…

Burns Night Dinner Jan 25 2017

Burns Night Celebrations

Here is the recipe….

Neep’s and Tattie’s Patties (Vegetable burgers with Oats, Turnips and Sweet Potatoes)

 

  • ¾ Lbs sweet potatoes (cut in half lengthwise)
  • ¾ lbs small turnips (cut in half lengthwise)
  • 1 cup quick oats (1 minute oats)
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa
  • 2 cups of cooked black beans (mashed a little)
  • 1 large shallot (finely diced)
  • ½ cup mixed fresh herbs (parsley, cilantro, chives)
  • 1 tsp natural sea salt
  • ½ tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp cumin powder
  • Dash of hot sauce
  • semolina flour (about ¼ cup to roll Patties)
  • Coconut oil (about 3 Tbsp to sauté)

How to make them

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Line a baking tray with aluminum foil and place cut sweet potatoes and Rutabaga’s flesh side down.  Roast for about 35-40 minutes or until soft.  Set aside to cool and then remove the skin from flesh.
  2. To make the patties in a large bowl combine the sweet potatoes, rutabaga, cooked black beans, shallots, mixed herbs, salt, pepper, paprika, hot sauce and cumin.   Use a potato masher to evenly incorporate all the ingredients together.
  3. Process the large oats slightly in the food process and then add to the mixture stirring to combine and thicken the patties.
  4. Divide the mixture into 8 round balls and then flatten to create a disk shape. Dip each patty in to semolina flour.
  5. Add coconut oil to the pan and begin to cook the burgers in batches 3-4 minutes each side adding more oil as needed. The patties should have a brown crust.
  6. Serve warm and enjoy!

We still have a few spaces on our Historic Scotland Tour May 29th to June 4th 2017 ,please check out our website and send me an email…

http://www.shamrockandpeach.com

Judith@shamrockandpeach.com

Scottish hugs xxxx

Judith the Irish foodie

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Burns night, beyond haggis and Auld lang syne

January 25th is Burns Night, and to most, the Scots poet Robert Burns is a complete unknown and Burns Night a complete mystery. Yet, every New Years Eve we all link arms and mumble the words to ‘Auld Lang Syne’, do we not?’ Of course we do , and  if you’re like most people, you don’t actually know the lyrics to Auld Lang Syne beyond “should old acquaintance be forgot”, etc  but did you know that in the midst of your New Year frivolities you were are in fact  reciting the words of Scotland’s most notable poet? Yes, ’tis he of the tartan lands, the Scottish Shakespeare, the notable Robert Burns. More famous than a blue painted Mel Gibson in a skirt with a sword! Yes indeed, ‘tis the Bard himself, and every January 25th in pubs and clubs across the land Burns night suppers are held in his honor.

 So, what’s this all about again?

 Actually, joking aside, the Scots poet Robert Burns is a big deal inScotlandandNorthern Irelandand as such I thought it very fitting to write a wee blog in his honor and then follow up with a wee recipe that hails fromScotlandto warm us all up on these cold and wet winter nights.

 And who is he, this Burns guy?

 Well, our wee Robert Burns is a hero who lived in the 18th century and is regarded as Scotland’s favorite son. (Think of what Thomas Jefferson means to America, get it?) He is regarded as a pioneer of the Romantic movement, and after his death he became a great source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism and a cultural icon in Scotland and among the Scottish Diaspora around the world. And so, every year we dress up, eat haggis, sing songs and have a great ‘ol time being Scottish, even if you’re not!

 This year I’m actually celebrating the event by being a guest chef contributing to the Burn’s supper event at my local Irish pub, Olde Blinde Dog in Milton GA. Should be good craic as we say, and I may even sell a few more copies of the Shamrock and Peach!

So that’s your cultural lesson for this month, and tune in later this week as I’ll follow up Burns night with a really nice, truly Scottish recipe that is comfort food for cold nights!

So, I’ll leave you with our romantic Robbie burns and a verse of one of his famous poems I love….aaahhh.

 Robert Burns ( 1759–1796)

O my Luve’s like a red, red rose

That’s newly sprung in June

O my Luve’s like the melodie

That’s sweetly played in tune.

 

 

 

 

So, tune in next time for Burns night part two!

Judie the Irish Foodie!